Author Topic: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)  (Read 30614 times)

Offline jana

THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« on: 25/07/06, 14:29 »
History

Mainstream raves, sometimes described by the acronym Radical Audio Visual Experience, began in the late 1980s as a product of, reaction to, and rebellion against, trends in popular music, nightclub culture, and commercial radio.

In an effort to maintain distance and secrecy from the mainstream club scene (or perhaps for lack of affordable, receptive venues), warehouses, rental halls, and outside locations most often served as raves' venues. In an effort to control and curtail rave parties, some police and governmental bodies effectively outlawed raves in some areas. Such laws consequently forced regional electronic dance music events to move to formal venues, such as nightclubs and amphitheatres. Some venues and jurisdictions additionally prohibited certain types of rave fashion and paraphernalia.

Early raves were completely do it yourself; only a small number of people contributed to event production and promotion. Self-styled production and promotion companies have increasingly organized raves; the "companies" were usually unofficial or loosely defined. The companies promote their events by creating and distributing fliers and online bulletins.

As law enforcement agencies increasingly began paying attention to raves, concealing a party's location became important to an event's success. To that end, event organizers sometimes either promoted events solely by word-of-mouth, or would only reveal the date and location of the event to subscribers of an electronic mailing list or via voicemail. Some even went so far as to provide a series of clues or map checkpoints that ultimately led to the location of the rave.


What is a rave?
A rave is an all night event, where people go to dance, socialise, get high and generally have fun in an uninhibited way with other likeminded people. Some say it's about the creation of a community and re-connecting with something perceived as lost. Others just say it's about necking loads of pills and getting wasted with your mates in a field.

Where?
Usually in a derelict warehouse, a club, a beach, a field, an aircraft hangar or a sports arena - anywhere you could fit a massive sound system and a lot of people. In the rave heydays of the late '80s, the larger events attracted tens of thousands of people. The venue would often remain secret up until hours before the party was to begin as a way of keeping the police away. Organisers would even sometimes have backup sites in mind in case the cops sniffed them out - which they did more and more often.


Origins?
The term rave first came into use in Britain in the late 50's referring to the wild bohemian parties of the time. It was then briefly revived by the mods, but didn't come back into fashion until the illegal London warehouse party scene in the mid eighties. However it is likely that the term 'rave' came from Jamaican usage rather than a revival of any previous usage in Britain.



Who?
Rave crowds were and still are mostly (but not exclusively) young from all sections of society .

What is rave music?
Rave music is what most people now call 'dance' music, or as some government wonk put it, music with a distinctive 'series of repetitive beats'. Early ravers discovered that the combination of ecstasy and music with fast, repetitive beats was a marriage made in disco heaven. The big raves have a line-up of bigtime DJs as well as some live performances by dance music bands.

Why did rave culture take such a hold of the UK in the 1980s?
There are many theories why the UK went nuts for raving in the late 80s and beyond. It happened during a period of major consumerism and individualism. Margaret Thatcher was telling everybody to look after number one (famously saying there was "no such thing as society"). There was bound to be a reaction to this and it helped that a bunch of English DJs had just got back from Ibiza where they had experienced ecstasy and rave culture first hand. They brought it to the young people of Britain and within a year rave culture had flourished. Instead of money and power, rave called for empathy, intimacy, spirituality and the joy of losing yourself in the crowd.


Some other random thoughts: Doug Rushkoff, author of Ciberia, observed that the majority of house music runs at the speed of 120 bpm (the rate of the foetal heartbeat), while Simon Reynolds has noted that raves mimic the atmosphere of a nursery with its use of kids' TV themes, sampled baby vocals, dummies, baggy unisex clothes, and the camouflaging of drugs as sweets. Think about that next time you go dancing.

And then came the end
By the early '90s, the Tory government, the police, the tabloid press and middle England had all had enough of rave culture. The government acted, passing the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (1994).

Sections 63, 64 & 65 addressed the issue of raves:
A 'rave' is defined as a gathering of 100 plus people, at which amplified music is played which is likely to cause serious distress to the local community, in the open air and at night. These sections give the police the power to order people to leave the land if they're believed to be:


Preparing to hold a rave (two or more people)
Waiting for a rave to start (10 or more)
Actually attending a rave (10 or more)
Ignoring this direction, or returning to the land within the next week, are both offences, liable to 3 months' imprisonment and/or a £2,500 fine. Section 65 lets any uniformed constable who believes a person is on their way to a rave within a 5-mile radius to stop them and direct them away from the area - failure to comply can lead to a maximum fine of £1000.

The Act effectively killed off free parties or events not licensed through local government.
Aciiid is dead, long live Aciiid.

1985:
1985 - The Music - Acid House The History
Like it or not, house was first and foremost a direct descendant of disco. Disco had already been going for ten years when the first electronic drum tracks began to appear out of Chicago, and in that time it had already suffered the slings and arrows of merciless commercial exploitation, dilution and racial and sexual prejudice which culminated in the 'disco sucks' campaign. In one bizarrely extreme incident, people attending a baseball game in Chicago's Komishi Park were invited to bring all their unwanted disco records and after the game they were tossed onto a massive bonfire.

Disco eventually collapsed under a heaving weight of crass disco versions of pop records and an ever-increasing volume of records that were simply no good. But the underground scene had already stepped off and was beginning to develop a new style that was deeper, rawer and more designed to make people dance. Disco had already produced the first records to be aimed specifically at DJs with extended 12" versions that included long percussion breaks for mixing purposes and the early eighties proved a vital turning point.

However, it was not until the mid to late 1980s that a wave of psychedelic and other electronic dance music, most notably acid house and techno, emerged and caught on in the clubs, warehouses and free-parties around London and later Manchester. These early raves were called the Acid House Summers.

1990s: United Kingdom
Raves began to expand into a global phenomenon around 1989-1992, mostly on a grassroots basis: people who had travelled to attend the first raves in each region began setting up promotion companies, often informally, to organize their own parties. By the mid-1990s, major corporations were sponsoring events and adopting the scene's music and fashion for their "edgier" advertising, making the scene become more commercialized, in direct contrast to the anti-establishment groups who birthed the rave scene during the 1980s.

1990s: Europe
Rave culture was becoming part of a new youth movement. DJs and electronic music producers such as Westbam proclaimed the existence of a "raving society" and promoted electronic music as legitimate competition for rock and roll. Indeed, electronic dance music and rave subculture became mass movements. Raves had tens of thousands of attendants, youth magazines featured styling tips and television networks launched music magazines on house and techno music. The annual Love Parade festivals in Berlin attracted more than one million partygoers between 1997 and 2000.

Raves had also spread to far away places, such as Australia. In Australia the Melbourne Shuffle dance style has evolved over the last 15 years. American dancers started doing liquid dancing at this time.

2000s:
By the early 2000s, the terms "rave" and "raver" had fallen out of favor among many people in the electronic dance music community, particularly in Europe. Many Europeans returned to identifying themselves as "clubbers" rather than ravers. It became unfashionable among many electronic dance music affectionados to describe a party as a "rave," perhaps because the term had become overused and corrupted. Some communities preferred the term "festival," while others simply referred to "parties." True raves, such as "Mayday," continued to occur for a time in Central Europe, with less constrictive laws allowing raves to continue in some countries long after the death of rave in the United Kingdom. Moreover, traditional rave paraphernalia, such as facemasks, pacifiers, and glowsticks ceased to be popular.

In the northeastern United States, during the mid-2000s, the popularity of Goa (or psy-trance) increased tremendously. This is due to the fact that acceptance was never questioned in the sub-rave culture of Goa, and that this culture represents their selves as a community not a scene. With the warehouse party scene, the trend is also restarting; This contrary belief in the early 2000's was that 2002 would mark the end of the rave (known as party scene at the time), and the scene was over.

2006:
2006 is being marked as the renaissance of the underground electronic culture.









so, ............... let's discuss on rave history.

fyi, Wikipedia kan bisa di-edit ...
ada yg mo sumbang satu/dua paragraf mengenai RAVE / CLUB SCENE di Indonesia?
ato kita barengan kasih input di thread ini, trus dirangkum .. dan masukin ke wikipedia?
sepertinya butuh bantuan dr yg senior neh... :)

*just an idea.
« Last Edit: 25/07/06, 14:33 by jana »
:P

Offline dirtynumbangelboy

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #1 on: 25/07/06, 18:09 »
mau masukin indonesian rave culture di wikipedia ye cha?
wah gw rasa paling pas Oom ROMY, NARO, atau ANTON nih yang lebih pantas mengisi, hehehe.. ;D

tante nay

  • Guest
Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #2 on: 25/07/06, 20:07 »
rave : a gathering in a large area where repetitive music playing and recreational drugs taken. :D

Offline sonique

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #3 on: 25/07/06, 22:31 »
Quote
rave : a gathering in a large area where repetitive music playing and recreational drugs taken.

dalam bahasa indonesia... rekreasi musik pake vitamin penambah stamina...  ;)
u should feel what i feel
u should take what i take

Offline jana

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #4 on: 26/07/06, 00:32 »
ye.... enyahlah kaw bisikan syaitooonnn..   ;D jk


serius....

tante nayo dkk, gmn ni yg dah senior..  riset kecil"an donq rave indonesia jaman baheula tuh pegimana gt..
masa ngerjain skripsi mulu sih? tck.. apa pentingnya sih itu? eheheh
:P

tante nay

  • Guest
Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #5 on: 26/07/06, 16:18 »
hahaha..skripsi penting buat masa depan..
kan sambil berprestasi kita bere*ktasi..

hahahaha

Offline Debon

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #6 on: 27/07/06, 11:13 »
FIRST RAVE DI INDONESIA ADALAH HASIL KERJA DJ ACHDIYAT!!! HE IS THE REAL MAN!!

Salute n Big thanks....

Offline dafkaf

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #7 on: 27/07/06, 16:27 »

hmmm...

seinget gw nih, BLISS [ achdiyat, stewart, alan, henry ] juga bikin sekitar thn '93 awal - tp lupa pastinya - hbs mrk ini pelopornya sih.. SALUTE!!!

BLISS ini dr era '93 sampe '94 konstan bikin party juga dr cilandak sport centre trus manari sampe niaga tower

terus thn '93, di lapangan golf PI juga pernah ada open air party [ boleh d blg rave kecil - mungkin? ] ; yg ngerjain RIM dulu masih pake indra namanya

thn '93 akhir gw brg romy ngerjain party d puncak - yg restoran d pesawat yg d gantung itu..

trus thn '94 brg romy & naro ngerjain party d anyer pertama kali - ini cikal bakal AQUASONIC sekarang [ one of memorable moments ya juo...  :) ]

d thn '94 itu juga anton sering bikin party brg "phil PURE" ( kalo ga salah...huhuuhuu ) d koi sama yg d cinere yah?

dan banyak2 lagi ya...

ada yg mau koreksi n nambahin mungkin?

cheers,

;)
state of | MIND | your own | MUSIC | is | MY LIFE | in a state of mind

Offline bananasplit

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #8 on: 27/07/06, 17:24 »
gw pernah juga dateng ke party nya bliss di manari (museum satria mandala)...kira-kira masih kelas 3 smp gw waktu itu...decornya gokil pake kain kain putih sama obor....lagu 2 nya masih benuansa acid house / techno kayak shamen (move any mountain) dj nya yg maen stewart yg bule sama achdiyat buat gw pribadi lagunya sih enak enak utk di jaman itu....
terus future party yg di koi mahakam juga gw pernah dateng yg di motori oleh dj anton...seru juga....musiknya boleh di bilang US house /garage / detroit techno/acid house
waktu masih party 2 underground house mulai di jakarta......house tung-tung belom ada...
kalo nggak salah anton,achdiyat& dony (R.I.P) juga pernah buat party di pulau mana gitu ??? cuman gw nggak dateng 

illegal substance (E) di jaman itu merupakan barang yg sgt taboo & really exciting buat perdana (kl kata tante nayo...heheheh)...setelah mereka mental kanan kiri sebagai mobile dj (kala itu) maka mulailah konsep 2 gokil tersalurkan melalui club culture ...dengan di awali dgn the fisrt underground house club " B1", di mulai dgn formasi achdiyat,henry,stewart,alan,dony(R.I.P)...seiring dgn berjalannya waktu mulai terjadi dinmika pergantian formasi resident dj...mulai masuk dj irwan & dj romy yg mengusung house/techno di kala itu....ada juga lagi masuk resident dj guntur,taha ,indra (a.k.a DJ RIM) yg sempat juga mengeluarkan kompilasi kaset B1 yg ada lagu "talk to me",kala itu dj indra (rim) rambutnya masih gondrong kayak anak metal ..huehuheuhue
terus dj naro juga sempat menjadi resident di akhir akhir periode ,kala itu banyak sekali dj yg sudah main di B 1 ,seperti dj raden,bonzo,anton,boby (stadium),aziz (stadium),riri (waktu itu masih kurus dan abg heheheh dan lagunya keras keras banget)...mantep deh pokoknya
terus M club buka di blok m setelah B 1 buka di niaga tower yg di ikuti pula dgn parkit,bengkel ....
terus sekarang udah jamnnya embassy,wb,centro,vertigo dll...bahkan katanya mos mau buka di jkt....

gw pernah chit chat sama sven vath (germany) ...dia mengatakan sebetulnya rave itu artiinya "bergaul"..dgn di salurkan melalui prasarana music,view,atmosphere (cold beer...hehehehh)
bukan berarti rave party hrs yg open air...di club juga kita rave ;D

ada yg mo nambahin??.......................
................................................. .....
................................................. .......
your house is my house

Offline Ian

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #9 on: 27/07/06, 18:22 »
rave biasanya bersifat "camaraderie", supporting by large facilities/venues to enable "ravers" to express themselves in such creative ways be it their choice of interesting (some might call them campy) outifts or their unusual, refreshing dance movements.

However, banyak juga raves yang jadinya seperti large gathering of young nazis with more or less uniform -albeit non-mainstream- outfits and dance styles.

Offline fyong

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #10 on: 27/07/06, 20:30 »
History

Mainstream raves, sometimes described by the acronym Radical Audio Visual Experience, began in the late 1980s as a product of, reaction to, and rebellion against, trends in popular music, nightclub culture, and commercial radio.

In an effort to maintain distance and secrecy from the mainstream club scene (or perhaps for lack of affordable, receptive venues), warehouses, rental halls, and outside locations most often served as raves' venues. In an effort to control and curtail rave parties, some police and governmental bodies effectively outlawed raves in some areas. Such laws consequently forced regional electronic dance music events to move to formal venues, such as nightclubs and amphitheatres. Some venues and jurisdictions additionally prohibited certain types of rave fashion and paraphernalia.

Early raves were completely do it yourself; only a small number of people contributed to event production and promotion. Self-styled production and promotion companies have increasingly organized raves; the "companies" were usually unofficial or loosely defined. The companies promote their events by creating and distributing fliers and online bulletins.

As law enforcement agencies increasingly began paying attention to raves, concealing a party's location became important to an event's success. To that end, event organizers sometimes either promoted events solely by word-of-mouth, or would only reveal the date and location of the event to subscribers of an electronic mailing list or via voicemail. Some even went so far as to provide a series of clues or map checkpoints that ultimately led to the location of the rave.


What is a rave?
A rave is an all night event, where people go to dance, socialise, get high and generally have fun in an uninhibited way with other likeminded people. Some say it's about the creation of a community and re-connecting with something perceived as lost. Others just say it's about necking loads of pills and getting wasted with your mates in a field.

Where?
Usually in a derelict warehouse, a club, a beach, a field, an aircraft hangar or a sports arena - anywhere you could fit a massive sound system and a lot of people. In the rave heydays of the late '80s, the larger events attracted tens of thousands of people. The venue would often remain secret up until hours before the party was to begin as a way of keeping the police away. Organisers would even sometimes have backup sites in mind in case the cops sniffed them out - which they did more and more often.


Origins?
The term rave first came into use in Britain in the late 50's referring to the wild bohemian parties of the time. It was then briefly revived by the mods, but didn't come back into fashion until the illegal London warehouse party scene in the mid eighties. However it is likely that the term 'rave' came from Jamaican usage rather than a revival of any previous usage in Britain.



Who?
Rave crowds were and still are mostly (but not exclusively) young from all sections of society .

What is rave music?
Rave music is what most people now call 'dance' music, or as some government wonk put it, music with a distinctive 'series of repetitive beats'. Early ravers discovered that the combination of ecstasy and music with fast, repetitive beats was a marriage made in disco heaven. The big raves have a line-up of bigtime DJs as well as some live performances by dance music bands.

Why did rave culture take such a hold of the UK in the 1980s?
There are many theories why the UK went nuts for raving in the late 80s and beyond. It happened during a period of major consumerism and individualism. Margaret Thatcher was telling everybody to look after number one (famously saying there was "no such thing as society"). There was bound to be a reaction to this and it helped that a bunch of English DJs had just got back from Ibiza where they had experienced ecstasy and rave culture first hand. They brought it to the young people of Britain and within a year rave culture had flourished. Instead of money and power, rave called for empathy, intimacy, spirituality and the joy of losing yourself in the crowd.


Some other random thoughts: Doug Rushkoff, author of Ciberia, observed that the majority of house music runs at the speed of 120 bpm (the rate of the foetal heartbeat), while Simon Reynolds has noted that raves mimic the atmosphere of a nursery with its use of kids' TV themes, sampled baby vocals, dummies, baggy unisex clothes, and the camouflaging of drugs as sweets. Think about that next time you go dancing.

And then came the end
By the early '90s, the Tory government, the police, the tabloid press and middle England had all had enough of rave culture. The government acted, passing the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act (1994).

Sections 63, 64 & 65 addressed the issue of raves:
A 'rave' is defined as a gathering of 100 plus people, at which amplified music is played which is likely to cause serious distress to the local community, in the open air and at night. These sections give the police the power to order people to leave the land if they're believed to be:


Preparing to hold a rave (two or more people)
Waiting for a rave to start (10 or more)
Actually attending a rave (10 or more)
Ignoring this direction, or returning to the land within the next week, are both offences, liable to 3 months' imprisonment and/or a £2,500 fine. Section 65 lets any uniformed constable who believes a person is on their way to a rave within a 5-mile radius to stop them and direct them away from the area - failure to comply can lead to a maximum fine of £1000.

The Act effectively killed off free parties or events not licensed through local government.
Aciiid is dead, long live Aciiid.

1985:
1985 - The Music - Acid House The History
Like it or not, house was first and foremost a direct descendant of disco. Disco had already been going for ten years when the first electronic drum tracks began to appear out of Chicago, and in that time it had already suffered the slings and arrows of merciless commercial exploitation, dilution and racial and sexual prejudice which culminated in the 'disco sucks' campaign. In one bizarrely extreme incident, people attending a baseball game in Chicago's Komishi Park were invited to bring all their unwanted disco records and after the game they were tossed onto a massive bonfire.

Disco eventually collapsed under a heaving weight of crass disco versions of pop records and an ever-increasing volume of records that were simply no good. But the underground scene had already stepped off and was beginning to develop a new style that was deeper, rawer and more designed to make people dance. Disco had already produced the first records to be aimed specifically at DJs with extended 12" versions that included long percussion breaks for mixing purposes and the early eighties proved a vital turning point.

However, it was not until the mid to late 1980s that a wave of psychedelic and other electronic dance music, most notably acid house and techno, emerged and caught on in the clubs, warehouses and free-parties around London and later Manchester. These early raves were called the Acid House Summers.

1990s: United Kingdom
Raves began to expand into a global phenomenon around 1989-1992, mostly on a grassroots basis: people who had travelled to attend the first raves in each region began setting up promotion companies, often informally, to organize their own parties. By the mid-1990s, major corporations were sponsoring events and adopting the scene's music and fashion for their "edgier" advertising, making the scene become more commercialized, in direct contrast to the anti-establishment groups who birthed the rave scene during the 1980s.

1990s: Europe
Rave culture was becoming part of a new youth movement. DJs and electronic music producers such as Westbam proclaimed the existence of a "raving society" and promoted electronic music as legitimate competition for rock and roll. Indeed, electronic dance music and rave subculture became mass movements. Raves had tens of thousands of attendants, youth magazines featured styling tips and television networks launched music magazines on house and techno music. The annual Love Parade festivals in Berlin attracted more than one million partygoers between 1997 and 2000.

Raves had also spread to far away places, such as Australia. In Australia the Melbourne Shuffle dance style has evolved over the last 15 years. American dancers started doing liquid dancing at this time.

2000s:
By the early 2000s, the terms "rave" and "raver" had fallen out of favor among many people in the electronic dance music community, particularly in Europe. Many Europeans returned to identifying themselves as "clubbers" rather than ravers. It became unfashionable among many electronic dance music affectionados to describe a party as a "rave," perhaps because the term had become overused and corrupted. Some communities preferred the term "festival," while others simply referred to "parties." True raves, such as "Mayday," continued to occur for a time in Central Europe, with less constrictive laws allowing raves to continue in some countries long after the death of rave in the United Kingdom. Moreover, traditional rave paraphernalia, such as facemasks, pacifiers, and glowsticks ceased to be popular.

In the northeastern United States, during the mid-2000s, the popularity of Goa (or psy-trance) increased tremendously. This is due to the fact that acceptance was never questioned in the sub-rave culture of Goa, and that this culture represents their selves as a community not a scene. With the warehouse party scene, the trend is also restarting; This contrary belief in the early 2000's was that 2002 would mark the end of the rave (known as party scene at the time), and the scene was over.

2006:
2006 is being marked as the renaissance of the underground electronic culture.









so, ............... let's discuss on rave history.

fyi, Wikipedia kan bisa di-edit ...
ada yg mo sumbang satu/dua paragraf mengenai RAVE / CLUB SCENE di Indonesia?
ato kita barengan kasih input di thread ini, trus dirangkum .. dan masukin ke wikipedia?
sepertinya butuh bantuan dr yg senior neh... :)

*just an idea.


jana ,ngapain sih nanya 2 history ???

jadi banyak yg curhat dehhh.... ;)
good music + cold beer = "good time"

Offline seno

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #11 on: 31/07/06, 11:26 »
kl boleh di tambahkan sebenarnya EDM di indo (jakarta khususnya ) sempet juga stuck di era 96-2000 kali yeee....
tapi (boleh di katakan) kebangkitan era modern scene bisa di bangkitkan kembali oleh clubhoppers indika di tahun 2000,dimana 1945 music factory pun mulai lagi menjalankan kontribusinya utk local scene di indo...future dan nepathya juga boleh di katakan sebagai kontributor terbesar juga utk massive event seperty jakarta movement,rhytym unity dll
....menurut gw yg terbaik bagi dance scene local sekarang adalah "stick together and respect each other" supaya apa yg ingin kita salurkan (ide 2 kita ) menjadi seuatu yg terbaik bagi kita semua

vive la muzika ,halah...  :P
" MAKE IT HAPPEN "

Offline dirtynumbangelboy

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #12 on: 31/07/06, 18:49 »
penting juga menunjukan ke masyarakat luas,
kalo statement yang berbunyi; dance scene = drugs scene itu salah besar. :)

Offline jana

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #13 on: 01/08/06, 17:46 »
sib sib. gile.. makasih bgt. this will mean a great deal loh...
nnt mlm akan dirangkum semua, terjemahin... trus dimasupin ke wiki.

feel free to share us some more. :)
:P

Offline dirtynumbangelboy

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #14 on: 01/08/06, 19:36 »
ntar kasih link nye ya cha kalo udh di post di wiki. ;)

Offline jana

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #15 on: 04/10/06, 01:42 »
almost done!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rave_in_Indonesia


ada yg mo nyumbang foto" ?
bisa di edit lagi lo klo mo nambah info...
:P

Offline Discomfort

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #16 on: 04/10/06, 02:53 »
Gw ada beberapa foto menarik dari acara Subspace di terowongan bawah tanah di ITB, kerjasama Biosampler dan Future10, gw taro di site multiply gw di http://discomfort.multiply.com . Judul albumnya Biosampler: Subspace and other haluciogenics.

Btw.. Good work @ wiki mbak!!
Anarchy. Now

Offline dj ferdy

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #17 on: 04/10/06, 17:15 »
kalau rhythm unity di jkt?
..CAUSE IM ADDICTED TO DRUMS, AND IM A SLAVE TO THE DARK BEAT....

Offline fyong

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #18 on: 04/10/06, 17:24 »
clubhoppers ,rawks  ;)
good music + cold beer = "good time"

Offline jazzymike

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #19 on: 05/10/06, 00:29 »
almost done!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rave_in_Indonesia


ada yg mo nyumbang foto" ?
bisa di edit lagi lo klo mo nambah info...




cha,chris lawrence nga pernah dateng ksini kali....  ;)

Offline Must Energic

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #20 on: 05/10/06, 01:03 »
ntar coba gw cari ya cd gw yang dulu...
ada foto2 beberapa rave di jogja
piss
DIGITALIZED YOUR WORLD

Offline jana

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #21 on: 05/10/06, 17:30 »
almost done!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rave_in_Indonesia


ada yg mo nyumbang foto" ?
bisa di edit lagi lo klo mo nambah info...




cha,chris lawrence nga pernah dateng ksini kali....  ;)


eh iya.. gue kira prnh pas mbc playground. :P
dah di-edit. thanks, mikey...

@ must energic

gmn klo skalian rave history di jogja-nya aja.... ;D nnt jana terjemahin lagi.. huhu

@ discomfort

ini gue udah upload foto dr multiply lo ke wiki. check lagi aja: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rave_in_Indonesia
btw keren gela nih eventnya... kpn bikin yg kyk gini lagi?

@ dj ferdy

sib. dah dimasupin pak rhythm unity nya.. :)

@ fyong

iya ni...
nnt pingin tambahin The Media.. tp lg ngga sempet ngetik lg.. thanks! :)
:P

Offline Discomfort

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #22 on: 05/10/06, 22:56 »
Huwaaaaaah!!! Thx yah! Mantap!! hiihihih...
Anarchy. Now

Offline Papapey

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #23 on: 06/10/06, 08:51 »
Hi coba gw bantu must energic

Rave di Jogja mulai ada sekitar tahun 99, kalau gak salah yang ngadain Performace Fucktory (Zuki cs), waktu itu namanya masih Indonesia Banget "Mencari Harmoni"... dan belum spesifik pada EDM, masih campur baurdgn band.... Mencari Harmoni ini kemudian menjadi cikal bakal "Parkinsound" yang terakhir digelar tahun 2004 di pelataran Candi Prambanan. Sebagaimana konsep awalnya, Parkinsound pun musiknya campur baur, tapi main menunya adalah Drum n Bass.... Dan bisa jadi Parkinsound adalah rave DnB terbesar yang pernah diselenggarakan di Indonesia, lebih dari 3000 orang.... Bener nggak Dj Jerome????

Awal tahun 2000an, Energy Room (Numan, Endo, Abah, dll) mulai bikin annual party Energetic yang kesohor itu di Candi Boko... Energy Room punya peran penting bagi kehidupan dance scene Jogja..

Selain Energy Room ada juga komunitas Shaker Kotabaru (Kukuh, Boni, Fani, cs..) yang juga menjadi pioner bikin party di tahun 2003an.....

Tahun 2004 boleh dikata merupakan tahun penting buat perkembangan dance scene di Jogja. In this year, almost every month ada rave, mulai dari Jogja Beach Party sampe Godskitchen... Bahkan sempet sebulan ada 3 kali rave.... Karena seringnya rave di Jogja, akhirnya partygoers/ravers di Jogja jadi nuambah buanyak... dan ini mengilhami munculnya club-club baru di Jogja like TJ's, MBC, etc... Semenjak itu dj-dj top indo jadi sering ke Jogja, bahkan Abank sekarang jadi Wong Jogja... hehehe bukan begitu Abank?????

but, menurutku, The Jogja Real Man is Pak Ucoxz, dia sangat konsisten support local dance scene anda local dj hingga sekarang salute...! mengenai foto, tak pikir ravelex "orde lama" punya kok

Offline KoJack

Re: THE HISTORY OF RAVE (in Indonesia?)
« Reply #24 on: 06/10/06, 09:20 »
kalo di bandung mah.....di prakarsai oleh RADIO OZ
kalo ga salah ..yg pertama tuh di the PEAK ?   **ato gua itu mah yah ?**CMIIW
Walau makan susah Walau hidup susah
Walau tuk senyumpun susah
Rasa syukur ini karena bersamamu
juga susah dilupakan

(Ku Bahagia - Sherina)

Tags:
 

Related Topics

  Subject / Started by Replies Last post
33 Replies
2546 Views
Last post 04/07/07, 12:48
by Mario 78
3 Replies
806 Views
Last post 03/05/07, 10:48
by walasok
38 Replies
4363 Views
Last post 22/11/07, 21:38
by JESSY ECHY
3 Replies
847 Views
Last post 03/06/14, 10:52
by The Bobby
0 Replies
82 Views
Last post 12/06/14, 19:01
by NEWS



SimplePortal 2.3.3 © 2008-2010, SimplePortal